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Good Friday

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The power of God’s mercy has taken hold of us and will not let go of us: therefore we have become foolish.  We can no longer love wisely.  And because we have emptied ourselves in this folly which He has sent upon us, we can be moved by His unpredictable wisdom, so that we love whom we love and we help whom we help, not according to plans of our own but according to the measure laid down for us in His hidden will, which knows no measure.  In this folly, which is the work of His Spirit, we must love especially those who are helpless and who can do nothing for themselves.  We must also receive love from them, realizing our own helplessness, and our own inability to fend for ourselves. . . . Mercy fulfills the whole law [Thomas Merton, Seasons of Celebration, 181]

THE MYSTERY OF GOD’S MERCY AND LOVE

Two others also, who were criminals, were led away to be put to death with him. . . . One of the criminals who were hanged there kept deriding him and saying, “Are you not the Messiah?  Save yourself and us!”  But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation?  And we indeed have been condemned justly, for we are getting what we deserve for our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.”  Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”   He replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”

Luke 23:32, 39-43

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things don’t fall apart

A good day is when I visit Cynthia Newberry Martin’s Catching Days site and I especially received a gift when I read her February 14th post about Lucille Clifton.

Cynthia quoted from Clifton’s book of poetry, A Good Woman: Poems and Memoir 1969-1980

Things don’t fall apart.

Things hold.

Lines connect in thin ways that last and last

and lives become generations made out of pictures

and words just kept.

Speaking to Michael S. Glaser during an interview for the Antioch Review, Clifton reflected that she continues to write, because “writing is a way of continuing to hope … perhaps for me it is a way of remembering I am not alone.” How would Clifton like to be remembered?  “I would like to be seen as a woman whose roots go back to Africa, who tried to honor being human. My inclination is to try to help.”