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Tag Archives: Tennessee

inter-connectedness

Although genealogy can be used to justify privilege, it can also be used to impart values.  While in certain eras it has appeared to be the preserver of society’s elites, its universal application bespeaks the importance of origins for all humanity.  It can be used to divide, yet the myriad relationships it uncovers imply the interconnectedness of the human race.

– David Thackery, “Editor’s Note” [Communities of Kinship Antebellum Families and the Settlement of the Cotton Frontier by Carolyn Earle Billingsley]

My ancestor, Susan Elizabeth “Susie” Glenn with her sisters (Mary Ellen, Ethel Mae, and Emma Jane) when they attended Cherokee Female Seminary at Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

They were the daughters of Jesse Edward Glenn (1848 – 1902) and Margaret Leann Cowan (1851-1895) and granddaughters of Henry Glenn (ca 1805 – before 1880) and Jennie Foreman (1816 – 1881).

Jennie Foreman’s Cherokee ancestor was Richard Bark “OO-YA-LU-GI ”  Foreman (ca 1779 – after 1843) and Julia Talley (died approximately 1816).

Register of Persons Who Wish Reservations under the Treaty of July 8, 1817

July 1817

#11 – Bark Forman – two in family – on the road from McNairs to Knoxville
No. of Reservation:  12

Richard Bark Foreman’s mother was Susie Gourd “Kah-tah-yah” /Gourd (Rattling-gourd), a full-blood Cherokee of the Paint Clan.  His father was John Anthony Foreman, a Scotsman (perhaps born in Scotland . . . and perhaps in Pennsylvania), who was a trader among the Indians.

TENNESSEE PASSPORTS
Knoxville
11th March 1797

Sir,

My instructions from the Honorable the Secretary of War require that I report to you the names of all persons residing in the Cherokee country not natives of the land.

For this purpose I have collected the following Schedule of their names & employments which I am induced to believe is tolerable accurate.

[Listed are names, nation, employments; among those include John Anthony Foreman.]

Anthony Foreman (no nationality listed), “Trader & idler”

The blanks in the “Nation” column are either Americans or unknown.  Those whose characters are noted in the third column I have represented according to the best information I have been able to receive.

I am very respectfully, Sir, . . .
Silas Dinsmoor

To His Excellency Governor Sevier
_____

“[Human beings] look separate because you see them walking about separately.  But then, we are so made that we can see only the present moment.  If we could see the past, then of course it would look different.  For there was a time when every man was part of his mother, and (earlier still) part of his father as well, and when they were part of his grandparents.  If you could see humanity spread out in time, as God sees it, would look . . . like one single growing thing–rather like a very complicated tree.  Every individual would appear connected with every other.”

– C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

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family reunions – and family research – and curiosity

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Family reunions not only bring up memories but create new memories.  Sometimes, one meets cousins you don’t know and reconnect with folks you have not seen in some time.

My Caldwell and Sammon families (like all families) have interesting stories.  We ALL have stories.

The Caldwells come from a Scottish heritage (the rumor was/is that we are somehow related to Oliver Cromwell and King James I of England and VI of Scotland).  Who knows??

The Sammon family was PERHAPS Irish and English.  Again who knows?

Three generations back, two Caldwell brothers married two Sammon sisters – so I have countless double cousins.

Thanks to the internet and recently, Facebook, I’ve reconnected with some of the cousins and it is great!

Exchanging photographs with my Facebook relatives, I notice that  the family resemblance is uncanny (although of course that shouldn’t be at all surprising!).

Living in Seguin, Texas, I have read about Captain Matthew Caldwell.  Try as I may, I’ve not discovered anything about his parents; of course I’ve been curious to learn whether he is related to my Caldwell family.  Again – who knows?

From the Sons of Dewitt Colony Texas site:

Mathew (Old Paint) Caldwell was born in Kentucky about 1798 and is said to have acquired the nickname because of white spots in his hair, beard and on his breast like a paint horse. According to Kemp in The Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, Caldwell is thought, like the Burkett, Zumwalts, Kents, and DeWitts,  to have come from Missouri. Baker in Texas Scrapbook says he came from Tennessee. Other records indicate that Caldwell and his family were part of the party who came to the colony as part of the Tennessee-Texas Land Company.   Land records indicate that Caldwell arrived in the DeWitt Colony with a family of 5 on 20 Feb 1831. He received title to a sitio of land on 22 Jun 1831 southwest of current Hallettsville in Lavaca County near the Zumwalt Settlement.   In Gonzales Caldwell acquired the original James Hinds residence  on Water St. across from the Guadalupe River south of the Dickinson and Kimble Hat Factory.  Dixon in The Men Who Made Texas states that Caldwell was born 8 Mar 1798, moved with his parents to Missouri in 1818, became a skilled Indian fighter in Missouri and was involved in trading with local Indians in the territory.  Dixon further states he came to Texas from Missouri via Natchitoches by horseback in 1833 and first settled in current Sabine County where he was elected along with Stephen Blount and Martin Parmer to represent the area at the Independence Convention of 1836.  Election returns in Gonzales County show Caldwell and John Fisher were elected delegates from that municipality for the convention.  On 2 Mar, Caldwell along with William C. Crawford and William D. Lacy were appointed by the President to procure couriers to send expresses to the army “Believing it of vital importance that this convention know correctly the true situation of our enemy on the frontier, and also the condition of our army, they would recommend the convention to accept the services of Major Caldwell, who purposes to start this day to the frontier.”

In Nov 1835, he was appointed a subcontractor by William Pettus, main contractor appointed by the Provisional Government of Texas, to supply a Volunteer Army. On 1 Feb 1836, he and John Fisher were elected delegates from the Gonzales Municipality  to the Texas Independence Convention of 1836 at Washington-on-the Brazos and both were signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Caldwell was one on the committee of three appointed to assess the situation of the enemy on the frontier and the condition of the Texian army.

The Book Lady and the Philanthropist

Harold Grinspoon credits Dolly Parton with inspiring him to send books to Jewish children at no cost.  In four years, he has given away two million Jewish-themed books to Jewish families.

Parton’s book program Imagination Library was started in 1996 to promote reading among children in Sevier County, Tennessee, where she grew up in the Great Smoky Mountains.

In 1996, Dolly Parton launched an exciting new effort to benefit the children of her home county in east Tennessee. Dolly wanted to foster a love of reading among her county’s preschool children and their families. She wanted children to be excited about books and to feel the magic that books can create. Moreover, she could insure that every child would have books, regardless of their family’s income.

So she decided to mail a brand new, age appropriate book each month to every child under 5 in Sevier County. With the arrival of every child’s first book, the classic The Little Engine That Could ™, every child could now experience the joy of finding their very own book in their mail box. These moments continue each month until the child turns 5—and in their very last month in the program they receive Look Out Kindergarten Here I Come.

Needless to say the experience has been a smashing success. So much so that many other communities clamored to provide the Imagination Library to their children. Dolly thought long and hard about it and decided her Foundation should develop a way for other communities to participate. The Foundation asked a blue ribbon panel of experts to select just the right books and secured Penguin Group USA to be the exclusive publisher for the Imagination Library. Moreover a database was built to keep track of the information.

Consequently, in March of 2000 she stood at the podium of The National Press Club in Washington, D.C. and revealed the plan for other communities to provide the Imagination Library to their children. And as only Dolly can say it, she wanted to “put her money where her mouth is – and with such a big mouth that’s a pretty large sum of money” and provide the books herself to the children of Branson, Missouri and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina – communities where her businesses now operate. If other leaders in their communities were willing to do the same, well something big might just happen.

football season!

Every football season, I know where I can find Hubby and  have become accustomed to  hollering at the television screen, some coaching from his recliner, a big bowl of popcorn and a cool drink at halftime.  I’ve come to enjoy this season – whether I’m watching the games or just passing through the room now and then.  When thinking of things I would miss: DH watching football and hollering and coaching and coming up now and then for food and drink.

I’m accustomed to this and indeed can’t imagine life without this ritual.

It’s the little ordinary things . . .