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His eye is on the sparrow

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Happy St. Pat’s Day!

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St. Patrick’s Day was established as a way to recognize Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. Originally a religious holiday, it is now practiced on March 17th by many people throughout the world with food, drink and all things green.

One of the largest St. Patrick’s Day’s celebration that I’ve seen was each year in Denver, Colorado.  There were lines all around the block at Duffy’s in downtown Denver; however, every business in town was celebrating.  There was a large parade and the festivities continued until the next morning!  Ah – the Denver St. Pat’s memories!

Know the history: Though history saw celebrations of feasts in his honor, St. Patrick’s Day was not officially recognized until 1976. Saint Patrick has been credited with bringing Christianity to Ireland.
Most sources agree that St. Patrick’s actual name was Maewyn Succat. They also agree that Maewyn was kidnapped and sold into slavery at age 16 and, to help him endure his enslavement, he turned to God.

Six years after his captivity began, St. Patrick escaped from slavery to France, where he became a priest, and then the second Bishop to Ireland. He spent the next 30 years establishing schools, churches, and monasteries across the country. He brought Christianity widespread acceptance amongst the pagan indigenous peoples.
It is thought that St. Patrick used a shamrock as a metaphor for the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), showing how three individual units could be part of the same body. His parishioners began wearing shamrocks to his church services. Today, “the wearing of the green” on St. Patrick’s Day represents spring, shamrocks, and Ireland.

The date of St. Patrick’s death is still up for discussion. Some say that he died on March 17th, 461 AD. Another possibility is either March 8th or 9th – the days were added together to get March 17th. What is certain is that the holiday came to America in 1737, and was celebrated in Boston that year.

My Cowan lineage is supposed to be Irish (although I’ve not yet connected all of the dots).

one thought leads to another

The Facebook back-and-forth always brings up another thought  . . . and another thought . . . and I love it!

Exchanging messages with a beloved cousin on Facebook brought to mind a song my youngest son would sing:  “I am a promise; I am a possibility.”

And – aren’t we all??  Possibilities and promises . . .

I am a promise
I am a possibility
I am a promise with a capital “P”
I am a great big bundle of potentiality
And I am learnin’ to hear God’s voice
And I am tryin’ to make the right choice
I am a promise to be anything God wants me to be.

I can go anywhere that He wants me to go
I can be anything He wants me to be
I can climb the high mountains
I can cross the wide sea
I’m a great big promise you see!

I am a promise
I am a possibility
I am a promise with a capital “P”
I am a great big bundle of potentiality
And I am learnin’ to hear God’s voice
And I am tryin’ to make the right choice
I’m a promise to be anything God wants me to be
Anything God wants me to be!