RSS Feed

Tag Archives: Seguin

welcome!

 

MCQUEENEY, TEXAS. McQueeney is on Farm Road 78 four miles west of Seguin in west central Guadalupe County. German settlers moved to the area around 1870. When the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway was built through the area in 1876, the stop was named Hilda. In 1900 C. F. Blumberg built a store a mile east of the rail stop. Hoping to persuade the railroad to move the stop from Hilda to his store, he called the site McQueeney, in honor of the superintendent of the Southern Pacific line. The post office which opened in 1900 was called McQueeney, but the railroad did not move the stop from Hilda to the store site. In 1914 McQueeney had two general stores and forty residents. Lake McQueeney, also called Lake Abbott, was built a mile northeast of the community in 1925 by means of a dam across the Guadalupe River. It became a popular area for recreation and for summer homes. McQueeney had 300 residents and nine businesses by the 1940s; a population of 640 was served by twenty-three businesses in 1988. In 1990 the population was 2,063. The population grew to 2,527 in 2000.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Willie Mae Weinert, An Authentic History of Guadalupe County (Seguin, Texas: Seguin Enterprise, 1951; rpt. 1976).

Source:  Handbook of Texas Online

Note:

Carl F. Blumberg was born in Germany at the Russian border which is probably Poland today. The year was 1798. He died in 1853 of Yellow Fever and is interred in the Schumannsville Cemetery at Schumannsville, Texas – north of Seguin and 3 miles south of New Braunfels. Carl F’s education and principle profession was that of a school teacher.

Advertisements

snap of the day

Finders Keepers

If you have not been to the McKee ‘dig’  in Seguin, take a trip out there and learn about all of the artifacts that have been (and are being) found on this property.  It is amazing.

Michael Cary wrote about this find in the Seguin Gazette-Enterprise June 17, 2008:

SEGUIN — Local archeologist Robert “Bob” Everett paid a visit Thursday morning to an excavation site where hundreds of arrowheads, spear points and other Native American artifacts were recently uncovered along the banks of the Guadalupe River.

“This is the richest archeological site I’ve seen on the Guadalupe River in 35 years,” said Everett, a steward with the Texas Historical Commission’s Texas Archeological Stewardship Network.

Craig Childs writes “with lyrical grace” about searching for relics.  Finders Keepers is a Great Read.

From Child’s book:

“It is a job.  Workers go out and dig.  They pull up every artifact they find.  Perfectly legal and not entirely academic, it is a workingman’s science.  Plats and blueprints tell where to excavate.  Practitioners are known as “salvage” or “rescue” archaeologists.  In information circles, they call themselves “shovel bums,” toiling through cities and along pipelines, where they remove all pertinent archaeology in the way of development.

“There is a growing demand for this particular brand of archaeologist.  Backhoes are digging up slave cemeteries and ancient pagodas, forcing cities to cough up their dead, and somebody has to deal with it.  Roman burials are cropping up in London while archaeologists in downtown Miami ponder a circle of postholes that were cut into bedrock a couple of thousand years ago, doing so on behalf of a frustrated developer who has been planning luxury condominiums for this spot.  After thousands of years of traffic, a marketplace in Cairo recently revealed a temple containing a four-ton statue of Ramses II that had been right under people’s feet.  Even in the slums of Mexico City, pieces of the fallen Aztec Empire keep showing up.  In 2006, construction work exposed a thirteen ton stone carving of an earth goddess, and when salvage archaeologists went in they discovered it was topping the tomb of an Aztec emperor.  This could be the biggest discovery in Mexican history, as they dig through the city’s wet,mucky foundations to find it.”

“. . . In his essay on whether we can actually harm the dead, Geoffrey Scarre of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Durham, England, wrote, ‘Whilst a bone may be no more animate than a stone, it is the relic of a man or woman who once thought and felt, was happy and sad, loved and feared as we do.  To disinter or disturb it, or to subject it to chemical or physical analysis, is to take a liberty–not with the thing itself but with the person to whom it once belonged.’ “

snap of the day

snap of the day

Seguin’s Riverwalk will be stunning

The Walnut Branch restoration already has indications of the beauty and serenity
we will be able to  enjoy on our Very Own Riverwalk.

It will be a marvelous addition to Seguin!

I can envision a Moonlight & Roses event in this beautiful (and soon to be more beautiful) area!

will miss Mi Casita