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Tag Archives: Sammon

family reunions – and family research – and curiosity

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Family reunions not only bring up memories but create new memories.  Sometimes, one meets cousins you don’t know and reconnect with folks you have not seen in some time.

My Caldwell and Sammon families (like all families) have interesting stories.  We ALL have stories.

The Caldwells come from a Scottish heritage (the rumor was/is that we are somehow related to Oliver Cromwell and King James I of England and VI of Scotland).  Who knows??

The Sammon family was PERHAPS Irish and English.  Again who knows?

Three generations back, two Caldwell brothers married two Sammon sisters – so I have countless double cousins.

Thanks to the internet and recently, Facebook, I’ve reconnected with some of the cousins and it is great!

Exchanging photographs with my Facebook relatives, I notice that  the family resemblance is uncanny (although of course that shouldn’t be at all surprising!).

Living in Seguin, Texas, I have read about Captain Matthew Caldwell.  Try as I may, I’ve not discovered anything about his parents; of course I’ve been curious to learn whether he is related to my Caldwell family.  Again – who knows?

From the Sons of Dewitt Colony Texas site:

Mathew (Old Paint) Caldwell was born in Kentucky about 1798 and is said to have acquired the nickname because of white spots in his hair, beard and on his breast like a paint horse. According to Kemp in The Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, Caldwell is thought, like the Burkett, Zumwalts, Kents, and DeWitts,  to have come from Missouri. Baker in Texas Scrapbook says he came from Tennessee. Other records indicate that Caldwell and his family were part of the party who came to the colony as part of the Tennessee-Texas Land Company.   Land records indicate that Caldwell arrived in the DeWitt Colony with a family of 5 on 20 Feb 1831. He received title to a sitio of land on 22 Jun 1831 southwest of current Hallettsville in Lavaca County near the Zumwalt Settlement.   In Gonzales Caldwell acquired the original James Hinds residence  on Water St. across from the Guadalupe River south of the Dickinson and Kimble Hat Factory.  Dixon in The Men Who Made Texas states that Caldwell was born 8 Mar 1798, moved with his parents to Missouri in 1818, became a skilled Indian fighter in Missouri and was involved in trading with local Indians in the territory.  Dixon further states he came to Texas from Missouri via Natchitoches by horseback in 1833 and first settled in current Sabine County where he was elected along with Stephen Blount and Martin Parmer to represent the area at the Independence Convention of 1836.  Election returns in Gonzales County show Caldwell and John Fisher were elected delegates from that municipality for the convention.  On 2 Mar, Caldwell along with William C. Crawford and William D. Lacy were appointed by the President to procure couriers to send expresses to the army “Believing it of vital importance that this convention know correctly the true situation of our enemy on the frontier, and also the condition of our army, they would recommend the convention to accept the services of Major Caldwell, who purposes to start this day to the frontier.”

In Nov 1835, he was appointed a subcontractor by William Pettus, main contractor appointed by the Provisional Government of Texas, to supply a Volunteer Army. On 1 Feb 1836, he and John Fisher were elected delegates from the Gonzales Municipality  to the Texas Independence Convention of 1836 at Washington-on-the Brazos and both were signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Caldwell was one on the committee of three appointed to assess the situation of the enemy on the frontier and the condition of the Texian army.

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My Barton Ancestry

My Barton Ancestry:

Quite likely my Barton family descends from a David Barton, who, with his brother Abraham came to America from England in 1672.  Abraham settled first in Maryland, and subsequently in New England.  David settled on the James River, Virginia, and his descendants continued to live in northern Virginia.  The ancestors of the Keyes/Kees/Keys family were early settlers of Virginia of Revolutionary stock.  [However, this supposition is difficult regarding the dates of a Thomas Barton, who is undoubtedly my first known American ancestor . . . the search continues!  Hoping a Barton researcher happens upon this Aimless site!]

MY BARTON LINE:

I. – THOMAS BARTON and Unknown Wife

II – THOMAS BARTON, JR. and wife, Grace (perhaps surname is Drummond)

III – THOMAS BARTON II and wife Mary Willoughby

IV. – DAVID BARTON and wife Ruth Oldham

V. – SUSAN BARTON and husband John Thrasher

VI. – DAVID THRASHER and wife Mary “Polly” Hughey

VII. – ELIZABETH SUSAN THRASHER and husband Robert W. Sammon

VIII. – ROBERT WALKER SAMMON, SR. and wife Maria de los Santos Leal

EVERYONE seems to have Texas connections.  In my Barton family is one CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON, son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr. who was born in South Carolina and lived in Mississippi and Louisiana.

CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON
1856-1941
Conway Oldham Barton, Jr., son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr., from North Carolina, and his wife, Martha Cox, from South Carolina, was born June 7, 1856 on his father’s plantation in Milam County, Texas, near Calvert, which consisted of three leagues of land with 157 slaves, He had three brothers: Lemuel, John Harold, and Frank, all of whom served in the Confederate States army.
Page 103 {neglected to note the source . . . shame on me . . .}
Said Conway Oldham Barton was educated in a private school at Port Sullivan, Texas Military Academy at Austin, and University of Virginia, 1876-77, taking a course in law, and began to practice at Cameron, Milam County, Texas, and married Mary Blanche Crow, who died in 1882, and had two daughters by her, Manda Galen, who married Felix E. Smith, and Ann Caroline, who died in 1924.
His second wife was Carrie Moshen of Buda, Illinois, whom he married at Las Animas, Colorado, on January 4, 1887. Six children came to this marriage: Raymond O., born at Granada, Colorado, August 22, 1889; Percy O., born Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, February 11, 1897, and the other four children died in infancy. Raymond O. graduated from West Point, and is now stationed with the rank of Colonel at Fort Benning, Georgia.
Conway Oldham Barton moved from Granada, Colorado, to Wellington, Collingsworth County, Texas, where he was elected and served a term as county judge in said county in 1892. In 1895 he came to Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, where he practiced law until the establishment of the United States Court at Ada in 1902, when he removed to Ada and continued the practice of law until his death. In 1910 he was appointed county judge of Pontotoc County to fill out an unexpired term. In the general election that year he was elected to said office and served that full term. He was mayor of Ada in 1906-08.
As a devoted husband and father, he was appreciated and so remembered.
—R. L. Williams