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Tag Archives: Louisiana

bois d’arc tree – Rayville, Louisiana

French trappers were the first to encounter the tree which they named bois d’arc because the native tribes used the tough wood to make their bows. The first tree Lewis and Clark sent back east from St. Louis in 1804 was the “Osage Apple,” a tree that the French trader Pierre Chouteau had picked up from the Osage Indians 300 miles to the south and west.

The fruit of the bois d’arc tree (pronounced BO-dark), also known as Osage orange or locally as a bois d’arc apple, contains high levels of natural chemicals called isoflavones. Research has indicated that consumption of isoflavone compounds, which are found in dietary plants such as soybeans, may play a role in lowering one’s risk for heart disease and cancer, ease menopause symptoms and improve bone health.

“Coming up with a magic bullet to treat Alzheimer’s disease is a long way off, but I think there’s a chance of learning something through natural products such as the isoflavones produced by Osage orange. They probably will not provide an immediate drug, but understanding their biological activities may indicate an avenue of research for developing a new pharmaceutical.”

Source: A&M Systemwide

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serenity

Bring me the sunset in a cup . . . – Emily Dickinson

snap of the day

Camp Ruston – Louisiana

Posted on

During World War II, Camp Ruston was one of the largest prisoner of war camps in the United States. At its peak in October, 1943, the camp held 4,315 prisoners. The camp was built by the local T.L. James Company on 770 acres about seven miles northwest of Ruston, Louisiana in 1942. From June 1943 to June 1946, the camp served as one of more than 500 prisoner of war camps in the United States. The first 300 men, from Field Marshal Erwin Rommel’s elite Afrika Korps, arrived in August 1943. In 1944, the captured officers and crew of a German U-Boat were sent to the camp and kept in isolation in a restricted area in order to prevent them from communicating to the enemy that secret German naval codes had fallen into Allied hands. During 1944, French, Austrian, Italian, Czech, Polish, Yugoslav, Romanian, and Russian prisoners were also housed in the camp. During their incarceration in Camp Ruston, the prisoners benefited from food, medical care, and physical surroundings which were better than what their countrymen were experiencing at home. The prisoners engaged in athletic and crafts activities and allowed to organize an orchestra, a theater, and a library. Those prisoners who were enlisted men were required to work at the camp and for local farms and businesses. They picked cotton, felled timber, built roads, and performed other tasks to help solve the domestic labor shortage caused by the war. They were paid in scrip which they could use in the camp canteen. In 1944, the U.S. War Department began a program to educate prisoners of war throughout the United States in academic subjects. One source of books was the library of Louisiana Polytechnic Institute (now Louisiana Tech University). The Camp Ruston Collection contains the following materials: * Copies of National Archives records pertaining to Camp Ruston. * Official maps of the camp and USGS aerial surveys of the area. * Contemporary snapshots of Camp Ruston. * Books from the camp library Drawings, wood carvings, and other artwork crafted by the prisoners. * Items unearthed during Tech’s archaeology survey of the site. * Camp Ruston script, Christmas cards, dinner menus, musical concert programs, athletic equipment, and dinnerware.

[Source: POW Camps in Louisiana]

My Barton Ancestry

My Barton Ancestry:

Quite likely my Barton family descends from a David Barton, who, with his brother Abraham came to America from England in 1672.  Abraham settled first in Maryland, and subsequently in New England.  David settled on the James River, Virginia, and his descendants continued to live in northern Virginia.  The ancestors of the Keyes/Kees/Keys family were early settlers of Virginia of Revolutionary stock.  [However, this supposition is difficult regarding the dates of a Thomas Barton, who is undoubtedly my first known American ancestor . . . the search continues!  Hoping a Barton researcher happens upon this Aimless site!]

MY BARTON LINE:

I. – THOMAS BARTON and Unknown Wife

II – THOMAS BARTON, JR. and wife, Grace (perhaps surname is Drummond)

III – THOMAS BARTON II and wife Mary Willoughby

IV. – DAVID BARTON and wife Ruth Oldham

V. – SUSAN BARTON and husband John Thrasher

VI. – DAVID THRASHER and wife Mary “Polly” Hughey

VII. – ELIZABETH SUSAN THRASHER and husband Robert W. Sammon

VIII. – ROBERT WALKER SAMMON, SR. and wife Maria de los Santos Leal

EVERYONE seems to have Texas connections.  In my Barton family is one CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON, son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr. who was born in South Carolina and lived in Mississippi and Louisiana.

CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON
1856-1941
Conway Oldham Barton, Jr., son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr., from North Carolina, and his wife, Martha Cox, from South Carolina, was born June 7, 1856 on his father’s plantation in Milam County, Texas, near Calvert, which consisted of three leagues of land with 157 slaves, He had three brothers: Lemuel, John Harold, and Frank, all of whom served in the Confederate States army.
Page 103 {neglected to note the source . . . shame on me . . .}
Said Conway Oldham Barton was educated in a private school at Port Sullivan, Texas Military Academy at Austin, and University of Virginia, 1876-77, taking a course in law, and began to practice at Cameron, Milam County, Texas, and married Mary Blanche Crow, who died in 1882, and had two daughters by her, Manda Galen, who married Felix E. Smith, and Ann Caroline, who died in 1924.
His second wife was Carrie Moshen of Buda, Illinois, whom he married at Las Animas, Colorado, on January 4, 1887. Six children came to this marriage: Raymond O., born at Granada, Colorado, August 22, 1889; Percy O., born Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, February 11, 1897, and the other four children died in infancy. Raymond O. graduated from West Point, and is now stationed with the rank of Colonel at Fort Benning, Georgia.
Conway Oldham Barton moved from Granada, Colorado, to Wellington, Collingsworth County, Texas, where he was elected and served a term as county judge in said county in 1892. In 1895 he came to Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, where he practiced law until the establishment of the United States Court at Ada in 1902, when he removed to Ada and continued the practice of law until his death. In 1910 he was appointed county judge of Pontotoc County to fill out an unexpired term. In the general election that year he was elected to said office and served that full term. He was mayor of Ada in 1906-08.
As a devoted husband and father, he was appreciated and so remembered.
—R. L. Williams