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Tag Archives: Leroy Webb

Pawnee Eagle – Champion Quarterhorse

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Excerpt from Leroy Webb The Last Cowboy by Davis L. Ford:

The centerpiece of Leroy and Nora’s professional life at their Monte Vista ranch was developing their quarter horse breeding program and performing in the quarter horse show circuit.  Leroy had developed the necessary skills and knowledge during his tutelage under Wiescamp, knew the prerequisite importance of the right bloodlines, and became immediately successful.  Pawnee Eagle was his first stallion, and he was a great one.

. . . Leroy stated that “I have had the pleasure of riding some exceptionally great horses, but the most outstanding was Pawnee Eagle.  His character, size, and ability left nothing to be desired.  As a sire, he passed on all these characteristics to his offspring.”

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branding time

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a mountain

As a young child until my teen years, we lived in Tucumcari, New Mexico.  Every now and then I go back for the Tucumcari Reunion (and love visiting old friends and making new friends).  Haven’t been back for a reunion in awhile; it is probably time!

This area of New Mexico is mostly flat (certainly doesn’t have the mountain range that we enjoyed when we lived in Denver).

However, Tucumcari has a mountain. Yep folks –  that’s Tucumcari mountain in the background  – standing sentinel while Leroy Webb (The Last Cowboy) feeds his horses and I figure that Leroy and his friend plan to have a cup of coffee later and trade horse stories.

Cowboy Poetry

Cowboy Poetry is in a league all its own and I especially love to hear it recited and sung.  When we first moved to Seguin, Judge B. B. Schraub and his wife Estella would come by our house on their daily walks.  Estella said they had been going to the Cowboy Poetry Gatherings for years and never missed a one.  Estella passed away in 2008 and I know that the Judge misses her every day – and misses the things they always did together, such as the Poetry Gatherings.

My grandfather, Berlin Caldwell, was a friend of New Mexico lawman Fred Lambert, who published a book of poetry entitled Bygone Days of the Old West.  A first edition copy of this book is kept under a locked glass case in the Denver Public Library and is a beautiful book, illustrated with pen and ink drawings by Lambert.

Fred Lambert told me many stories about the Wild West days in Cimarron, New Mexico and the surrounding area.  He  knew my maternal great-grandfather Robert Walker “Bob” Sammon and delighted me with his remembrances.

At the time of Bob Sammon’s death, he was doing some work for Thomas Benton Catron, a controversial New Mexico politician and lawyer in early New Mexico.

An aside about Fred Lambert:  his father, Henri (Henry) Lambert built the St. James Hotel in Cimarron, New Mexico.  This hotel has a most interesting history; we stayed there several years ago when we were in New Mexico for a family reunion – but didn’t hear or see any ghosts!

The St. James Hotel, built in 1872-80. Built by French entrepreneur Henri Lambert, a former field cook for U.S. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and a White House chef for President Abraham Lincoln, the two-story adobe property began as Cimarron’s best saloon, built in 1872. Several men were shot and killed there, the violence evident in the 26 bullet holes in the bar’s pressed tin ceiling, now the hotel’s elegant dining room.

ANOTHER aside:  the Real Live Cowboy in our family – now in the 21st Century – is Leroy Webb (whom my grandchildren adore!! – well, we  all adore Leroy).