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My Thrasher Lineage

Family is everything.  It defines you–the heart of your spirit, the heritage of your smile, not only the color of your eyes but how they see the world.  You are bound by kinship.  You add your own link to the chain, and that is where you strengthen or weaken what you have been blessed–or burdened–with.  That is where you use the indefinable quality that belongs to only you, the bit of uniqueness you pass on to your children for good or bad, the part of you that will always be separate from those who share your name, your blood, and your past.

– Deborah Smith [Blue Willow]

1 John THRASHER I
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Birth:       ABT 1725/1730, Probably Virginia
Death:       1788/1790, North Carolina

Spouse:       Ruth (link to Isaac not proven) CLOUD
Birth:       Probably Virginia
Death:       Perhaps North Carolina
Father:       Isaac (Perhaps) CLOUD
Mother:       (Cloud, Isaac, wife of)

Children:       Joseph Cloud (-1810)
Mary (-1783)
Isaac Cloud (~1755-)
John (1758-1844)

1.1a Joseph Cloud THRASHER*
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Death:       1810

Spouse:       Margaret (LEWIS??)

Children:       Margaret (-1802)
Joseph
Richard
Cloud (-~1803)
Isaac (-1815)

Other Spouses Zenith “Zena” GREER

1.1b Joseph Cloud THRASHER* (See above)
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Spouse:       Zenith “Zena” GREER

Children:       John

Other Spouses Margaret (LEWIS??)

1.2 Mary THRASHER
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Death:       1783

Spouse:       Daniel McCOLLUM
Birth:       about 1700, Scotland
Death:       April 1, 1779, Guilford County, North Carolina
Marr:       about 1765

Children:       William (1763-1833)
David (~1763-1833)
Isaac (1767-1848)
Jacob (1763-<1806)
Thrasher (>1770-1814)
Cloud (>1770-)

1.3 Isaac Cloud THRASHER
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Birth:       ABT 1755/1760

Spouse:       Ruth BARTON
Birth:       about 1760
Father:       David BARTON (~1730-<1772)
Mother:       Ruth OLDHAM (~1734->1807)

1.4 John THRASHER Sr.
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Birth:       April 16, 1758, North Carolina
Death:       June 5, 1844, Clark County, Georgia

Spouse:       Susan BARTON
Birth:       February 14, 1766, Virginia Or North Carolina
Death:       April 21, 1837, Clarke Or Oconee County, Georgia
Father:       David BARTON (~1730-<1772)
Mother:       Ruth OLDHAM (~1734->1807)
Marr:       April 16, 1782

Children:       Mary (1783-1788)
Ruth (1784-1858)
Barton (1788-1867)
Elizabeth (1790-1818)
Isaac (1793-1878)
David (1796-1882)
John (1798-1839)
Frances “Fanny” (1801-1879)
Susannah “Susan” (1802-1892)
Mary Oldham (1806-1871)

I descend from John Thrasher and Ruth Cloud through their son John Thrasher, Jr. and Susan Barton.

John Thrasher, Jr. and Susan Barton had a son – David Thrasher who married Mary “Polly” Hughey.  My ancestors.


Will of David Thrasher is on file in the records of Newton County, Georgia
Records Book 3, pp. 156-159

WILL of DAVID THRASHER
State of Georgia)
Newton County)

In the name of God!  Amen.  I, DAVID THRASHER of said State and County being of advanced age, but of sound and disposing mind and memory.  Knowing that I must shortly depart this life, deem it right and proper both as respects my family and myself that I should make a disposition of the property yet remaining in my hands with which I have been blessed by a kind Providence, I do, therefore make this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and annulling all others by me heretofore made.

First.  I desire and direct that my body be buried in a decent and Christian like manner, suitable to my circumstance and condition in life – to wit: My grave to be protected and fenced as that of my departed wife and the expenses of my burial and fixing of my grave to be paid by my daughter ELIZABETH SAMMONS, she having been paid by me to do so.  My soul I trust shall return to rest with God who gave it as I hope for Salvation through the merritts and work of Jesus Christ.

Second.  I desire and direct that all my just debts be paid by my executor herein after named and appointed.

Third.  It is my will and desire that the following heirs to my property shall not share in the remainder of which I am now possessed.  I having given them their full share and to some of them more than an equal share: to wit:  MARY O. SCOTT, ELIZABETH S. SAMMONS, FRANCES J. HARPER, LOUISA C. VANDERGRIFF my daughters and DAVID H. THRASHER, JOSEPH A. THRASHER, my sons, and the bodily heirs of my son, JAMES C. THRASHER.  My grandchildren all of whom shall not share as stated in the remainder of my property.

Fourth.  It is my will and desire that my other heirs: to wit: JOHN J. THRASHER, WILLIAM W. THRASHER and my grandchildren the bodily heirs of my daughter, MARTHA C. GREER, shall share and share alike in all my property of every kind of which I am possessed or may be possessed by my death, provided that my executor herein after named and appointed shall in the division of my remaining property charge to and collect from JOHN J. THRASHER six hundred dollars due Dec. 25, 1882 and ten per cent thereafter until paid.  Also the sum of six hundred dollars from my son WILLIAM W. THRASHER due December 25, 1882 and ten per cent thereafter until paid money loaned them by me for which I have their notes.  Also shall charge and collect from bodily heirs of THOMAS B. THRASHER my grandchildren the sum of two hundred dollars which I advanced to them, also charge and collect from the bodily heirs of ALBERT C. THRASHER, my grandchildren the sum of two hundred dollars advances to them by me.

Fifth.  I desire and direct that my Executor herein after named and appointed shall collect from my daughter MARY O. SCOTT and her husband or either of them the sum of four hundred and twenty dollars being a balance due me for land sold to JAMES SCOTT, the husband of my daughter, MARY O. SCOTT, with interest paid me by my other children per annum from October 1, 1878.  Also my Executor herein named and appointed shall collect from my daughter MARY O. SCOTT or her husband JAMES SCOTT the further sum of five hundred dollars advanced to them in a certain land trade or land sold to JAMES SCOTT, the husband of my daughter.  Said sum five hundred dollars due me or my estate on the 25th day of December 1882 and said executor shall charge and collect the rate of ten per cent per annum on said amount of five hundred dollars advanced to them after the 25th day of December 1882 if said amount is not paid by that time.

Sixth.  I desire and direct that if any of the heirs of Estate shall interfere, hinder, or contest this my last Will and Testament, my Executor shall not distribute to them their share and shall collect from them, if possible what may have been given them by me in person heretofore.

Seventh.  I hereby constitute and appoint my friends and neighbors

LEONIDAS F. LIVINGSTON
Executor of this my last Will and Testament.

This February 11, 1882.

DAVID (his X mark) THRASHER

Signed, sealed, declared and published by DAVID THRASHER as his last Will and Testament in the
Presence of the undersigned who subscribed our names hereto in the presence of each other.

This February 11, 1882.

L. F. LIVINGSTON
J. G. LASTER
C. W. TURNER
______________________________

 

Lizzie (and Borden ancestry)

If I had not had another commitment last night, I would have been at the Mosheim Mansion to see the performance about Lizzie Borden.  I am sure it was great fun!  The Asylum Ensemble of Texas presented “Lizzie Borden Took an Axe: The Lighter Side of Axe Murder.”

There will be another performance in November and if possible, I hope to see this show.  We are so fortunate to have businesses such as the Mosheim Mansion who give to the community in so many ways.

The Asylum Ensemble of  Texas is a group of local actors.  Its founders include Carol Hirshi (owner of the Mosheim Mansion), Griffin Darklighter and Brandi Atchley of Seguin along with Steve Zingraf of San Marcos.

Lizzie Borden and I share the same Borden ancestor: Richard Borden, born February 22, 1595 in Headcorn, England (died May 25, 1671 in Portsmouth, New Jersey) and Joane Fowle.  One of the earliest Borden ancestors I’ve researched is one Henry Borden who died 1370 in Headcorn, England.

The Bordens or Bourdens originally came to England from Normandy.

Lisbeth Borden Dies After Short Illness, Age 68 [67]

Lisbeth [sic: Lizbeth] A. Borden died this morning [in 1927]  at 306 French Street, where she had made her home for about 30 years.  She had been ill with pneumonia for about a week, although for some time she had been in failing health.

A member of one of the old Fall River families, having been the daughter of Andrew J. and Sarah Anthony [sic: Morse] Borden, she had lived here all of her life.  With her two maids, she lived a quiet retired life, paying occasional visits to out-of-town friends and receiving a few callers whose staunch friendship she valued highly.

Taking an intense pride in the surroundings in which she lived, she did much to improve the locality, purchasing adjoining property, that the same refined atmosphere might be maintained.  Greatly interested in nature, she was daily seen providing for the hundreds of birds that frequented the trees in her yard, taking care that the shallow box where they gathered with filled with crumbs, seeds and other foods that they favored.  She had miniature houses erected in her trees and, in these, frivolous squirrels made their homes.  Her figure as she visited with her wild callers, many of whom became so friendly that they never seemed to mind her approach, was a familiar one in that section.

Another pastime in which she greatly delighted was riding through the country roads and lanes.  She made frequent trips about town in her motor car, but was never so pleased as when winding through the shady country by-ways.

The death of Miss Borden recalls to many one of the most famous murder trials in the history of the state.  On the fourth of August, 1892, Andrew J. Borden and his wife, Abby D. Borden, were found murdered in their Second Street home.  After a preliminary investigation, Lisbeth Borden was arrested and formally charged with the murder of her father.  After a hearing in Fall River she was indicted by the grand jury and in November 1892 [June 1983], was tried and acquitted in new Bedford.

The trial attracted statewide interest.  No further arrests were ever made and the murder has remained an unsolved mystery since.  Following her acquittal, Miss Borden lived a rather retired life and devoted much of her time to private charities of which the public knew but little.

Gail Borden (inventor, architect, surveyor) is also in this Borden family.  If memory serves (although that isn’t a given these days!), Gail Borden also laid out the plans for Galveston, Texas.  Of course, what one most readily remembers about Gail Borden is his patent for condensed milk.

Stories.

Plain folks.

Infamous folks.

Interesting folks.

We ALL  have these family stories and I find the research fascinating.

“woven into the life of our ancestors”

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.  For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?

– Marcus Tullius Cicero

little surprises

Sometimes – little surprises – are  – surprising.

I opened a book I’ve not read in several years – probably (one of the surprises) since 2002.

There were a couple of pieces of paper serving as bookmarks in different places in Spiritual Notes to Myself Essential Wisdom for the 21st Century by Hugh Prather.

One ‘bookmark’ was torn from a September 24, 1999 e-mail message about my “Sammon Family in Gwinnett County, Georgia” and I could read only the first part of the message:

“The Elizabeth Sammon I am searching marrie”

and

“I need HELP to sort this all out, are you my a”

This was between pages 74 and 75 and the following paragraph on page 74 caught my attention:

Turning to our peaceful mind is an unremarkable process.  The shift is not accompanied by strong emotion.  It’s nice when I experience God’s peace and presence consciously.  But if on many occasions I receive it only unconsciously, I don’t want to waste an instant’s thought on that fact.  Let me simply continue my spiritual journey and be assured that the light of heaven still shines in me and all about me.

The second marker (between pages 40 and 41) brought back memories of breakfasts at Johnny Mac’s on Court Street (which – alas, is no longer there).

Quotations from those pages:

The reason it isn’t helpful to go around talking about our healings, visions, and other spiritual fireworks is that such conversations tend to be separating and unloving.  The little mind gets involved, we start feeling special, and the other person thinks he wasn’t invited to God’s party.

The saints of God dare to be ordinary.

Such a nice surprise between the pages of an inspirational book on this day: Friday, October 22, 2010.

Page 39:

Don’t give “feedback.”  Give truth.  The fact is that most people really are asking if they are wonderful, and my truth-filled answer is YES!  Each of God’s children is cherished and beloved.  Even though I know in my heart and prayers that truth doesn’t play favorites, I am dealing with one person at a time.

page 38:

When I’ve lost all interest in controlling outcomes, I finally will be free to love everyone my mind rests upon.

My Dutch Ancestry

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Descendants of Harmen Coerton of Voorhuysen

Descendants of Hendrick Matthyse Smock

Genealogy research is a passion, I suppose.  An addictive passion.

There are  many nationalities coursing through my veins and I track one or another – often quite surprised with the results.

My 4th great-grandfather William Poland was of German lineage. He married Mary Swadley, daughter of Nicholas Swadley and Elizabeth Hevener.  The Swadley family lived in Rockbridge County, Virginia and Pendleton County, West Virginia before moving to Highland County, Ohio.

In William Poland’s will, he names twelve children. Those not mentioned are: Peter, Phebe and Elizabeth.

Eliza McBee could be Elizabeth.

Marion County Will Book C, pages 45-46

‘My sons & daughters intended & spoken of in this will are John, William, Nicholas, Katharine Newman, Nathaniel, Mary Evans, Eliza Magbee, Samuel, Henry, Mahala Stamin and Martin.  Matilda Troth in addition to what she has already received to have the sum of five dollars.’

PROPERTY:  Public Sale of the Real Estate of William Poland; Indianapolis January 26, 1856.  About 220 acres in Marion County.

_____________________

Nicholas Swadley was the son of Marcus (Mark) Swadley and Catren (surname perhaps Maus).

There is a tradition that Mark accidentally shot a daughter while cleaning a gun and was so shocked that he is said to have never spoken again and died shortly thereafter.

Marcus (Mark) Swadley’s personal property was sold at public venue  September 15, 1772 [Augusta,Virginia  Will Book #6, page 10].

Final settlement of the estate was made March 18, 1772 [Augusta, Virginia  Will Book #6, page 10]
Mark’s wife’s name was Catren; there is a tradition that her last name was Maus (Mouse).  She may have later married John Clore, a widower.  They had no children and she outlived him.

our European ancestors

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Why do we want to know about ancestors?  I suppose it may be partly to learn how WE tick.  My Caldwell research will never end, I know – but I’ve found that the search is fascinating.

I just love this photograph of a beautiful young woman holding an umbrella.  Even if she had not married (briefly) into my Caldwell family, I still find the photograph so very intriguing.

If I had any ancestors in pre-historic Britain, there is information as to how they traveled.

How a prehistoric sat nav stopped our ancestors getting lost in Britain

Isosceles Triangle. An isosceles triangle has two congruent sides called legs and a third side called the base. The vertex angle is the angle is included by the legs. The other two angles are called the base angles. The base angles are congruent. The figure below depicts an isosceles triangle with all the parts labeled.

“Mah Lindy Lou” by Lily Strickland

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Lily Strickland was a prolific songwriter (and I only recently learned of her).

Family trivia:  Lily’s great-grandmother, Henrietta W. Sammon who married Oliver P. Strickland, was a sister to my ancestor Robert W. Sammon who married Susan Elizabeth Thrasher.

I realize this is of no interest whatsoever to anyone other than my Sammon relatives; however, Lily Strickland made a ‘notch’ in the musical venue that is admired to this day – information  which might be of interest to others.

Paul Robeson sang some of Lily’s compositions; Mah Lindy Lou seemed to be a favorite.