RSS Feed

Tag Archives: genealogy research

My Thrasher Lineage

Family is everything.  It defines you–the heart of your spirit, the heritage of your smile, not only the color of your eyes but how they see the world.  You are bound by kinship.  You add your own link to the chain, and that is where you strengthen or weaken what you have been blessed–or burdened–with.  That is where you use the indefinable quality that belongs to only you, the bit of uniqueness you pass on to your children for good or bad, the part of you that will always be separate from those who share your name, your blood, and your past.

– Deborah Smith [Blue Willow]

1 John THRASHER I
—————————————-
Birth:       ABT 1725/1730, Probably Virginia
Death:       1788/1790, North Carolina

Spouse:       Ruth (link to Isaac not proven) CLOUD
Birth:       Probably Virginia
Death:       Perhaps North Carolina
Father:       Isaac (Perhaps) CLOUD
Mother:       (Cloud, Isaac, wife of)

Children:       Joseph Cloud (-1810)
Mary (-1783)
Isaac Cloud (~1755-)
John (1758-1844)

1.1a Joseph Cloud THRASHER*
—————————————-
Death:       1810

Spouse:       Margaret (LEWIS??)

Children:       Margaret (-1802)
Joseph
Richard
Cloud (-~1803)
Isaac (-1815)

Other Spouses Zenith “Zena” GREER

1.1b Joseph Cloud THRASHER* (See above)
—————————————-

Spouse:       Zenith “Zena” GREER

Children:       John

Other Spouses Margaret (LEWIS??)

1.2 Mary THRASHER
—————————————-
Death:       1783

Spouse:       Daniel McCOLLUM
Birth:       about 1700, Scotland
Death:       April 1, 1779, Guilford County, North Carolina
Marr:       about 1765

Children:       William (1763-1833)
David (~1763-1833)
Isaac (1767-1848)
Jacob (1763-<1806)
Thrasher (>1770-1814)
Cloud (>1770-)

1.3 Isaac Cloud THRASHER
—————————————-
Birth:       ABT 1755/1760

Spouse:       Ruth BARTON
Birth:       about 1760
Father:       David BARTON (~1730-<1772)
Mother:       Ruth OLDHAM (~1734->1807)

1.4 John THRASHER Sr.
—————————————-
Birth:       April 16, 1758, North Carolina
Death:       June 5, 1844, Clark County, Georgia

Spouse:       Susan BARTON
Birth:       February 14, 1766, Virginia Or North Carolina
Death:       April 21, 1837, Clarke Or Oconee County, Georgia
Father:       David BARTON (~1730-<1772)
Mother:       Ruth OLDHAM (~1734->1807)
Marr:       April 16, 1782

Children:       Mary (1783-1788)
Ruth (1784-1858)
Barton (1788-1867)
Elizabeth (1790-1818)
Isaac (1793-1878)
David (1796-1882)
John (1798-1839)
Frances “Fanny” (1801-1879)
Susannah “Susan” (1802-1892)
Mary Oldham (1806-1871)

I descend from John Thrasher and Ruth Cloud through their son John Thrasher, Jr. and Susan Barton.

John Thrasher, Jr. and Susan Barton had a son – David Thrasher who married Mary “Polly” Hughey.  My ancestors.


Will of David Thrasher is on file in the records of Newton County, Georgia
Records Book 3, pp. 156-159

WILL of DAVID THRASHER
State of Georgia)
Newton County)

In the name of God!  Amen.  I, DAVID THRASHER of said State and County being of advanced age, but of sound and disposing mind and memory.  Knowing that I must shortly depart this life, deem it right and proper both as respects my family and myself that I should make a disposition of the property yet remaining in my hands with which I have been blessed by a kind Providence, I do, therefore make this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and annulling all others by me heretofore made.

First.  I desire and direct that my body be buried in a decent and Christian like manner, suitable to my circumstance and condition in life – to wit: My grave to be protected and fenced as that of my departed wife and the expenses of my burial and fixing of my grave to be paid by my daughter ELIZABETH SAMMONS, she having been paid by me to do so.  My soul I trust shall return to rest with God who gave it as I hope for Salvation through the merritts and work of Jesus Christ.

Second.  I desire and direct that all my just debts be paid by my executor herein after named and appointed.

Third.  It is my will and desire that the following heirs to my property shall not share in the remainder of which I am now possessed.  I having given them their full share and to some of them more than an equal share: to wit:  MARY O. SCOTT, ELIZABETH S. SAMMONS, FRANCES J. HARPER, LOUISA C. VANDERGRIFF my daughters and DAVID H. THRASHER, JOSEPH A. THRASHER, my sons, and the bodily heirs of my son, JAMES C. THRASHER.  My grandchildren all of whom shall not share as stated in the remainder of my property.

Fourth.  It is my will and desire that my other heirs: to wit: JOHN J. THRASHER, WILLIAM W. THRASHER and my grandchildren the bodily heirs of my daughter, MARTHA C. GREER, shall share and share alike in all my property of every kind of which I am possessed or may be possessed by my death, provided that my executor herein after named and appointed shall in the division of my remaining property charge to and collect from JOHN J. THRASHER six hundred dollars due Dec. 25, 1882 and ten per cent thereafter until paid.  Also the sum of six hundred dollars from my son WILLIAM W. THRASHER due December 25, 1882 and ten per cent thereafter until paid money loaned them by me for which I have their notes.  Also shall charge and collect from bodily heirs of THOMAS B. THRASHER my grandchildren the sum of two hundred dollars which I advanced to them, also charge and collect from the bodily heirs of ALBERT C. THRASHER, my grandchildren the sum of two hundred dollars advances to them by me.

Fifth.  I desire and direct that my Executor herein after named and appointed shall collect from my daughter MARY O. SCOTT and her husband or either of them the sum of four hundred and twenty dollars being a balance due me for land sold to JAMES SCOTT, the husband of my daughter, MARY O. SCOTT, with interest paid me by my other children per annum from October 1, 1878.  Also my Executor herein named and appointed shall collect from my daughter MARY O. SCOTT or her husband JAMES SCOTT the further sum of five hundred dollars advanced to them in a certain land trade or land sold to JAMES SCOTT, the husband of my daughter.  Said sum five hundred dollars due me or my estate on the 25th day of December 1882 and said executor shall charge and collect the rate of ten per cent per annum on said amount of five hundred dollars advanced to them after the 25th day of December 1882 if said amount is not paid by that time.

Sixth.  I desire and direct that if any of the heirs of Estate shall interfere, hinder, or contest this my last Will and Testament, my Executor shall not distribute to them their share and shall collect from them, if possible what may have been given them by me in person heretofore.

Seventh.  I hereby constitute and appoint my friends and neighbors

LEONIDAS F. LIVINGSTON
Executor of this my last Will and Testament.

This February 11, 1882.

DAVID (his X mark) THRASHER

Signed, sealed, declared and published by DAVID THRASHER as his last Will and Testament in the
Presence of the undersigned who subscribed our names hereto in the presence of each other.

This February 11, 1882.

L. F. LIVINGSTON
J. G. LASTER
C. W. TURNER
______________________________

 

Lizzie (and Borden ancestry)

If I had not had another commitment last night, I would have been at the Mosheim Mansion to see the performance about Lizzie Borden.  I am sure it was great fun!  The Asylum Ensemble of Texas presented “Lizzie Borden Took an Axe: The Lighter Side of Axe Murder.”

There will be another performance in November and if possible, I hope to see this show.  We are so fortunate to have businesses such as the Mosheim Mansion who give to the community in so many ways.

The Asylum Ensemble of  Texas is a group of local actors.  Its founders include Carol Hirshi (owner of the Mosheim Mansion), Griffin Darklighter and Brandi Atchley of Seguin along with Steve Zingraf of San Marcos.

Lizzie Borden and I share the same Borden ancestor: Richard Borden, born February 22, 1595 in Headcorn, England (died May 25, 1671 in Portsmouth, New Jersey) and Joane Fowle.  One of the earliest Borden ancestors I’ve researched is one Henry Borden who died 1370 in Headcorn, England.

The Bordens or Bourdens originally came to England from Normandy.

Lisbeth Borden Dies After Short Illness, Age 68 [67]

Lisbeth [sic: Lizbeth] A. Borden died this morning [in 1927]  at 306 French Street, where she had made her home for about 30 years.  She had been ill with pneumonia for about a week, although for some time she had been in failing health.

A member of one of the old Fall River families, having been the daughter of Andrew J. and Sarah Anthony [sic: Morse] Borden, she had lived here all of her life.  With her two maids, she lived a quiet retired life, paying occasional visits to out-of-town friends and receiving a few callers whose staunch friendship she valued highly.

Taking an intense pride in the surroundings in which she lived, she did much to improve the locality, purchasing adjoining property, that the same refined atmosphere might be maintained.  Greatly interested in nature, she was daily seen providing for the hundreds of birds that frequented the trees in her yard, taking care that the shallow box where they gathered with filled with crumbs, seeds and other foods that they favored.  She had miniature houses erected in her trees and, in these, frivolous squirrels made their homes.  Her figure as she visited with her wild callers, many of whom became so friendly that they never seemed to mind her approach, was a familiar one in that section.

Another pastime in which she greatly delighted was riding through the country roads and lanes.  She made frequent trips about town in her motor car, but was never so pleased as when winding through the shady country by-ways.

The death of Miss Borden recalls to many one of the most famous murder trials in the history of the state.  On the fourth of August, 1892, Andrew J. Borden and his wife, Abby D. Borden, were found murdered in their Second Street home.  After a preliminary investigation, Lisbeth Borden was arrested and formally charged with the murder of her father.  After a hearing in Fall River she was indicted by the grand jury and in November 1892 [June 1983], was tried and acquitted in new Bedford.

The trial attracted statewide interest.  No further arrests were ever made and the murder has remained an unsolved mystery since.  Following her acquittal, Miss Borden lived a rather retired life and devoted much of her time to private charities of which the public knew but little.

Gail Borden (inventor, architect, surveyor) is also in this Borden family.  If memory serves (although that isn’t a given these days!), Gail Borden also laid out the plans for Galveston, Texas.  Of course, what one most readily remembers about Gail Borden is his patent for condensed milk.

Stories.

Plain folks.

Infamous folks.

Interesting folks.

We ALL  have these family stories and I find the research fascinating.

“woven into the life of our ancestors”

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.  For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?

– Marcus Tullius Cicero

little surprises

Sometimes – little surprises – are  – surprising.

I opened a book I’ve not read in several years – probably (one of the surprises) since 2002.

There were a couple of pieces of paper serving as bookmarks in different places in Spiritual Notes to Myself Essential Wisdom for the 21st Century by Hugh Prather.

One ‘bookmark’ was torn from a September 24, 1999 e-mail message about my “Sammon Family in Gwinnett County, Georgia” and I could read only the first part of the message:

“The Elizabeth Sammon I am searching marrie”

and

“I need HELP to sort this all out, are you my a”

This was between pages 74 and 75 and the following paragraph on page 74 caught my attention:

Turning to our peaceful mind is an unremarkable process.  The shift is not accompanied by strong emotion.  It’s nice when I experience God’s peace and presence consciously.  But if on many occasions I receive it only unconsciously, I don’t want to waste an instant’s thought on that fact.  Let me simply continue my spiritual journey and be assured that the light of heaven still shines in me and all about me.

The second marker (between pages 40 and 41) brought back memories of breakfasts at Johnny Mac’s on Court Street (which – alas, is no longer there).

Quotations from those pages:

The reason it isn’t helpful to go around talking about our healings, visions, and other spiritual fireworks is that such conversations tend to be separating and unloving.  The little mind gets involved, we start feeling special, and the other person thinks he wasn’t invited to God’s party.

The saints of God dare to be ordinary.

Such a nice surprise between the pages of an inspirational book on this day: Friday, October 22, 2010.

Page 39:

Don’t give “feedback.”  Give truth.  The fact is that most people really are asking if they are wonderful, and my truth-filled answer is YES!  Each of God’s children is cherished and beloved.  Even though I know in my heart and prayers that truth doesn’t play favorites, I am dealing with one person at a time.

page 38:

When I’ve lost all interest in controlling outcomes, I finally will be free to love everyone my mind rests upon.

My Dutch Ancestry

Posted on

Descendants of Harmen Coerton of Voorhuysen

Descendants of Hendrick Matthyse Smock

Genealogy research is a passion, I suppose.  An addictive passion.

There are  many nationalities coursing through my veins and I track one or another – often quite surprised with the results.

My 4th great-grandfather William Poland was of German lineage. He married Mary Swadley, daughter of Nicholas Swadley and Elizabeth Hevener.  The Swadley family lived in Rockbridge County, Virginia and Pendleton County, West Virginia before moving to Highland County, Ohio.

In William Poland’s will, he names twelve children. Those not mentioned are: Peter, Phebe and Elizabeth.

Eliza McBee could be Elizabeth.

Marion County Will Book C, pages 45-46

‘My sons & daughters intended & spoken of in this will are John, William, Nicholas, Katharine Newman, Nathaniel, Mary Evans, Eliza Magbee, Samuel, Henry, Mahala Stamin and Martin.  Matilda Troth in addition to what she has already received to have the sum of five dollars.’

PROPERTY:  Public Sale of the Real Estate of William Poland; Indianapolis January 26, 1856.  About 220 acres in Marion County.

_____________________

Nicholas Swadley was the son of Marcus (Mark) Swadley and Catren (surname perhaps Maus).

There is a tradition that Mark accidentally shot a daughter while cleaning a gun and was so shocked that he is said to have never spoken again and died shortly thereafter.

Marcus (Mark) Swadley’s personal property was sold at public venue  September 15, 1772 [Augusta,Virginia  Will Book #6, page 10].

Final settlement of the estate was made March 18, 1772 [Augusta, Virginia  Will Book #6, page 10]
Mark’s wife’s name was Catren; there is a tradition that her last name was Maus (Mouse).  She may have later married John Clore, a widower.  They had no children and she outlived him.

our European ancestors

Posted on

Why do we want to know about ancestors?  I suppose it may be partly to learn how WE tick.  My Caldwell research will never end, I know – but I’ve found that the search is fascinating.

I just love this photograph of a beautiful young woman holding an umbrella.  Even if she had not married (briefly) into my Caldwell family, I still find the photograph so very intriguing.

If I had any ancestors in pre-historic Britain, there is information as to how they traveled.

How a prehistoric sat nav stopped our ancestors getting lost in Britain

Isosceles Triangle. An isosceles triangle has two congruent sides called legs and a third side called the base. The vertex angle is the angle is included by the legs. The other two angles are called the base angles. The base angles are congruent. The figure below depicts an isosceles triangle with all the parts labeled.

“Mah Lindy Lou” by Lily Strickland

Posted on

Lily Strickland was a prolific songwriter (and I only recently learned of her).

Family trivia:  Lily’s great-grandmother, Henrietta W. Sammon who married Oliver P. Strickland, was a sister to my ancestor Robert W. Sammon who married Susan Elizabeth Thrasher.

I realize this is of no interest whatsoever to anyone other than my Sammon relatives; however, Lily Strickland made a ‘notch’ in the musical venue that is admired to this day – information  which might be of interest to others.

Paul Robeson sang some of Lily’s compositions; Mah Lindy Lou seemed to be a favorite.

the search never ends

Posted on

MY WALKER HERITAGE

Grandparents:                   Elizabeth Clifford Sammon (1897-1985) and Berlin Caldwell (1883-1963)

G-Grandparents:              Robert Walker “Bob” Sammon (1861-1910) and Maria de los Santos Leal (1872-1905)

GG-Grandparents:           Robert W. Sammon (1837-1864) and Susan Elizabeth Thrasher (1838-)

GGG-Grandparents:        Mary B. Reins “Polly” Harrison (ca 1804-) and John Sammon Jr. (1782-1850)

4th G Grandparents:        Elizabeth “Betsy” Williams (1773-1846) and Clement King “Clem” Harrison (ca 1772-1805)

5th G Grandparents:        Barbara Walker (ca 1749-1819) and Matthew Jouett Williams (ca 1749-1818)

6th G Grandparents:         Thomas Walker (ca 1709-) and Elizabeth “Betty” Ellis (ca 1720-before 1798)

Note:  I have a double descent from Thomas Walker and Elizabeth “Betty” Ellis – sisters Barbara Walker who married Matthew Jouett Williams and Betty Walker who married John Sammon, Sr.

I’m not certain of the parents of Thomas Walker – I just keep searching . . .

Grandparents:                   Elizabeth Clifford Sammon (1897-1985) and Berlin Caldwell (1883-1963)

G-Grandparents:              Robert Walker “Bob” Sammon (1861-1910) and Maria de los Santos Leal (1872-1905)

2nd Grandparents:           Robert W. Sammon (1837-1864) and Susan Elizabeth Thrasher (1838-)

3rd G Grandparents:        John Sammon, Jr. (1782-1850) Mary B. Reins “Polly” Harrison  (ca 1804-)

4th G Grandparents:         Betty Walker (ca-1743-) and John Sammon, Sr. (ca1740-1812)

5th G Grandparents:        Thomas Walker (ca 1709-) and Elizabeth “Betty” Ellis (ca 1720-before 1798)

genealogy research

Posted on

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain perpetually a child. For what is the worth of a human life unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?
– Marcus Tullius Cicero, 106-43 B.C.


These are just a few of the family names I’m researching.

The active research comes and goes – but the interest is always there.

Human beings look separate because you see them walking about separately. But then we are so made that we can see only the present moment. If we could see the past, then of course it would look different. For there was a time when every man was part of his mother, and (earlier still) part of his father as well, and when they were part of his grandparents. If you could see humanity spread out in time, as God sees it, it would look like one single growing thing–rather like a very complicated tree. Every individual would appear connected with every other.
– C. S. Lewis

“Found a Yankee in my family tree; will trade for horse thief or other black sheep.”

Note:  in my family, I had southern Confederates and northern Yankees.  In the Revolutionary War, I had family members on both sides (some still in England).

Family is family.

My Barton Ancestry

My Barton Ancestry:

Quite likely my Barton family descends from a David Barton, who, with his brother Abraham came to America from England in 1672.  Abraham settled first in Maryland, and subsequently in New England.  David settled on the James River, Virginia, and his descendants continued to live in northern Virginia.  The ancestors of the Keyes/Kees/Keys family were early settlers of Virginia of Revolutionary stock.  [However, this supposition is difficult regarding the dates of a Thomas Barton, who is undoubtedly my first known American ancestor . . . the search continues!  Hoping a Barton researcher happens upon this Aimless site!]

MY BARTON LINE:

I. – THOMAS BARTON and Unknown Wife

II – THOMAS BARTON, JR. and wife, Grace (perhaps surname is Drummond)

III – THOMAS BARTON II and wife Mary Willoughby

IV. – DAVID BARTON and wife Ruth Oldham

V. – SUSAN BARTON and husband John Thrasher

VI. – DAVID THRASHER and wife Mary “Polly” Hughey

VII. – ELIZABETH SUSAN THRASHER and husband Robert W. Sammon

VIII. – ROBERT WALKER SAMMON, SR. and wife Maria de los Santos Leal

EVERYONE seems to have Texas connections.  In my Barton family is one CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON, son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr. who was born in South Carolina and lived in Mississippi and Louisiana.

CONWAY OLDHAM BARTON
1856-1941
Conway Oldham Barton, Jr., son of Conway Oldham Barton, Sr., from North Carolina, and his wife, Martha Cox, from South Carolina, was born June 7, 1856 on his father’s plantation in Milam County, Texas, near Calvert, which consisted of three leagues of land with 157 slaves, He had three brothers: Lemuel, John Harold, and Frank, all of whom served in the Confederate States army.
Page 103 {neglected to note the source . . . shame on me . . .}
Said Conway Oldham Barton was educated in a private school at Port Sullivan, Texas Military Academy at Austin, and University of Virginia, 1876-77, taking a course in law, and began to practice at Cameron, Milam County, Texas, and married Mary Blanche Crow, who died in 1882, and had two daughters by her, Manda Galen, who married Felix E. Smith, and Ann Caroline, who died in 1924.
His second wife was Carrie Moshen of Buda, Illinois, whom he married at Las Animas, Colorado, on January 4, 1887. Six children came to this marriage: Raymond O., born at Granada, Colorado, August 22, 1889; Percy O., born Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, February 11, 1897, and the other four children died in infancy. Raymond O. graduated from West Point, and is now stationed with the rank of Colonel at Fort Benning, Georgia.
Conway Oldham Barton moved from Granada, Colorado, to Wellington, Collingsworth County, Texas, where he was elected and served a term as county judge in said county in 1892. In 1895 he came to Pauls Valley, Indian Territory, where he practiced law until the establishment of the United States Court at Ada in 1902, when he removed to Ada and continued the practice of law until his death. In 1910 he was appointed county judge of Pontotoc County to fill out an unexpired term. In the general election that year he was elected to said office and served that full term. He was mayor of Ada in 1906-08.
As a devoted husband and father, he was appreciated and so remembered.
—R. L. Williams

My Ellis Heritage

My earliest known (to me) Ellis ancestor is JOHN ELLIS, born about 1685 in Nottoway Parish, Virginia.  John had at least three wives (probably four); my ancestor (I think!) is Mary (surname perhaps Bradley).

Their daughter Elizabeth Ellis married Thomas Walker.

Thomas Walker Sr. may be the grandson of one THOMAS WALKER who died circa 1760.  In this Thomas’s will he names a son, Thomas, and two grandsons Thomas.  One is the son of a deceased son and the other is Thomas, son of Thomas.  To this grandson Thomas, son of  Thomas, he leaves a slave, a mulatto boy, Lewis.

_______________________

In the 1784 Lunenburg County, Virginia Tax Records, Thomas Walker Jr. has a slave listed as Lewis.

_______________________

WILL OF JOHN ELLIS of Nottoway Parish
January 14, 1762
Probated April 22, 1762 by James Beuford
Filed Amelia County, Will Book 2, pp 21-32(?)

Witnesses: Charles Irby, James Beuford, Patrick Coine
Executrix: Wife Elizabeth Ellis
Executor: Son Richard Ellis
Sec: Charles Irby, John Hightower

Leg:  son William Ellis, 600 acres adjacent lines of Hardaway, Wade, Finney, Samuel Smith, line to be run from Hampton Wade’s lower corner near Jack’s branch to Finney’s nearest corner, but with condition that my son William Ellis pay my son Austin Ellis 50 pounds current Va. money in 3 years after my decease; if he refuses, then I give aforementioned land to my son Richard Ellis, and he pay son Austin 60 pounds to be raised out of my estate & paid by Ex. within 3 years after my decease; son Thomas Ellis; Thomas Walker & Betty his wife, 400 acres L/S Horsepen Creek, being land Walker now lives on & laid off by William Stokes; wife Elizabeth Ellis, labor & profits of 17 Negroes to maintain her & her family, & use & profits of plantation, together with 600 acres adj. for life or widowhood, then to son Richard Ellis; son Richard Ellis, 17 slaves, stock & furn. on plantation, also 16 other slaves, and 638 acres, the plantation he now lives on, incl. mill & land adj. both sides Great Nottoway River, & all rem. of my est.; son Richard Ellis to provide proper support & maintenance for my dau. Sarah Winn; George, Judy & Fanny [slaves] to continue to live on my plantation and not be put under an overseer; son Richard Ellis to manage and direct estate.

________________________________

I descend from two daughters of Thomas Walker and Betty EllisBarbara Walker who married Matthew Jouett Williams and Betty (probably Elizabeth) Walker who married John Sammon.

Genealogy research is addictive and certainly not everyone’s Cup of Tea.

Now, I realize that no one is interested in my Ellis/Walker/Sammon ancestors – except others who may be researching these particular families.  And I’m hoping that – by happenstance – fellow researchers will come across this site and we can exchange family information.

A distant cousin, Richard Ellis, had a distinctive Texas connection.

Ellis County is named for Richard Ellis, President of Texas’ Constitutional Convention, March, 1836. Mr. Ellis had no direct link to the county. He was a famous Texan whom the state felt needed to be remembered.

Other biographical information:

  • Born in Virginia, 1781
  • Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama, 1820
  • Signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and President of the Constitutional Convention, 1836
  • Senator of the Congress of the Republic of Texas, 1836 – 1840
  • Died in Bowie County, Texas, December 20, 1846.

My Coslet(t) Heritage

My earliest known Coslet(t) ancestor is Jacob COSLET (1772?-1835?)

Jacob COSLET (1772?-1835?).

Born 1772 (about)  in  Pennsylvania  probably in Cumberland County.  Jacob was Welsh but I don’t believe he was born in Wales; not certain when his parents came to the colonies.

Married (I don’t know the name of his wife) 1795 (approximately).

Died 1835 (approximately)        Indiana

from Common Welsh Names:

Coslett – arrived in Wales c. 1568 with a man name Corslett an iron smith. Cosslett.

The Surnames of Wales by John & Sheila Rowlands  Federation of Family

History Society Publications  1996

“COSLETT This name’s arrival in Wales can be dated to ca 1568  when a man named Corslett was brought over from Westphalia to work for the Mineral and Battery Company  whose owners Schultz and Humphey had a license from the Queen to make iron wire. Corslett was a smith skilled in making osmond iron  a soft iron need (sic) for wire making  and he worked at the forge at Monkswood  near Usk  Monmouthshire and then was sent to Tintern. His descendant George Corslett was born ca 1569 and is named (spelt Coslett) in a list of deponents as a finer of osmond iron in an action between Hanbury and the Exchequer in 1596. Parish records show many Cosletts working at the Machen and Trevethin  forges from late 17c to early 19c. They are concentrated in the area  bounded by Cardiff  Caerphilly  Trevethin and Newport up to the mid 19th century and have a strong connection with the metal industries  though some were coal mining  agriculture  innkeeping and general trade. The IGI before 1850 shows virtually no examples anywhere else in the UK  with the exception of London. The spellings Coslett and Corslett are common  while Corslett can still be found in 19th century records.  Patronyms are entirely absent  but one or two 19th century cases of Coslett occur (DWB). Even today this surname is to be found mainly in Gwent and  Glamorgan (see TD).

DWB=Jenkins (ed) Dictionary of Welsh Biography Down to 1940

TD=Telephone Directory

Isaac COSLET (1816-1837)

Born 4 Oct 1816  in  Ohio

Married Susan JENNINGS 15 May 1837  in  Vermillion County,  Indiana

Died 4 October 1899 in Atchison County, Missouri and is buried in unmarked graves in Lot 87, C-2 in the Osborn Cemetery, DeKalb County, Missouri.

Buried  in Osborn Cemetery,  DeKalb,  Missouri

He obtained a marriage license May 15,  1837 and was married a short time later.

Sp. Susan JENNINGS (1820-1906) daughter of Simeon JENNINGS (after 1780-before 1840) and Nancy WATKINS (1790-1844)

1.8.2  David COSLET (1842-1917)

Born 10 Jun, 1842    Terre Haute,    Indiana   Married Sarah Elizabeth BUTLER 9 Jan, 1868    Tuscola,  Douglas County,  Illinois

Died 10 Dec, 1917,    Claremore,  Rogers County,   Oklahoma

Buried Woodlawn Cemetery,  Claremore,  Rogers County,  Oklahoma

CERTIFICATE OF MARRIAGE

STATE OF ILLINOIS

COUNTY OF DOUGLAS SS.

I  Jack A. Allen, County Clerk in and for the said County in the State aforesaid  DO HEREBY CERTIFY THAT Mr. David Coslett age NA years and Miss Sarah E. Butler age NA years were united in Marriage at NA in the said County in the State aforesaid on the 9th day of January  A.D.  1868  by George Houk  a Justice of the Peace as the same appears of record in my office.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF  I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the Official Seal of said County  this 7th day of April A.D. 1982.

Jack A. Allen  County Clerk

Reg. 1  page 113

DAVID COSLETT DIES

David Coslett  born in Vermillion County  Ind.  the 10th day of June  1842  died at his home on East Second street  at 5:30 p.m. Monday  December 10  1917.  Married Sarah E. Butler  Vermillion county  Ind.  Jan. 9,  1868.  Born to them 12 children  including two pairs of twins  nine of which are now living.  Mr. Coslett and wife joined the Christian church and were baptized in the year of 1886.  They have made their home in Claremore for the past five years  a great part of which time Mr. Coslett has been in ill health. The end came after a stubborn illness which finally claimed his life.  The deceased leaves to mourn his loss an aged wife and nine children.

Funeral services were held from the family residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment was made in Woodlawn cemetery.

Sp. Sarah Elizabeth BUTLER (1848- ) dau. of Beckwith BUTLER (b.1824  bur.1886) and Malinda SMALLWOOD (1824-1884) [3919].

David Coslett and Sarah Elizabeth Butler had several children.  My ancestor was  Isaac Ross Coslett, Sr. who was born October 21, 1881 in Arcola, Douglas County, Illinois.  He married Mary Myrtle Troth (1894-1938), daughter of Darius Brittain Troth and Susie Elizabeth Glenn.

My Culwell/Caldwell Ancestry

Thomas Culwell died September 2, 1835 in Arkansas (perhaps Polk County).

The name has been spelled: Caldwell, Calwell, Cauldwell, Colwell, Coldwell, and Culwell.

ARKANSAS RECORDS:

In Goshen Cemetery there are many tombstones with the names Caldwell, Coldwell and Culwell.  despite the various spellings, they are all descendants of James Caldwell, born 1-10-1803 in Tennessee.  James came to Arkansas in 1834 from Alabama, with his wife Almedia Nixon, born 1-15-1809 in Alabama.

They brought with them six very small children and a niece, Rebecca Caldwell.  Rebecca married Jacob Oxford of Oxford Bend, near Goshen.  She has many descendants still in the county.)

He settled on a farm about two miles south of Goshen on Richland Creek.  James owned four slaves and was reputed to have kept his gold buried beneath a door step.  His seventh child, Elizabeth, born 4-5-1835, could remember going with him to a slave sale in Hindsville, Arkansas.  She could also remember hearing a negro woman crying at night, grieving for a child that she had been separated from.

The young mother, Almedia, gave birth to her 8th child, Hezekiah, on 12-4-1836.  She died two weeks later.

On May 25, 1837, James married Nancy Lamar, born 1-1-1812.  They had either nine or eleven children.  (Two listed in the family Bible may have been grandchildren.)

Very little personal history is known of most of these nineteen children.  The seventh child, Elizabeth, never married.  She lived to be 99 years old and some of her stories are still remembered.  At the beginning of the war James decided to remove his family from the dangers of the war and so packed up and went to Texas.  Elizabeth went to Benton County to stay with her sister, Martha Ann, who had married Edward Stringfield.  Later she decided to join the family and she and two other women, Dorcas Boyd and Kit Williams, started out on horseback.  They had many frightening experiences but arrived safely in Fannin County, Texas.  [See Flashback, January 1958]

In 1865 the Caldwells came home.  Allen Wood Caldwell, aged 17, was ill and died just as the wagon pulled into the yard.

Elizabeth, after her father’s death, lived with various relatives.  She spent two years in California and her last years with her niece and her niece’s husband, Ora and Lee Trammel.  She is buried in Goshen Cemetery under the headstone with “Aunt Liz” engraved on it.  Her death date is June 27, 1834.

Richard Jasper Newton Caldwell, the 13th child, had a granddaughter, Fern Culwell, who also never married.  She was a teacher and taught in many country schools in Washington County.

The third child, William, born December 27,1828 died March 26,1876.  He is the only one whose descendants lived here until recently.  He married three times.  His third wife, Nancy Combs, was the mother of Hezekiah “Joe” Culwell and Thomas Nixon “Nick” Culwell.

Nick’s son Lee lived in the Goshen area until his death a few years ago.

The sixth Caldwell child, Martha Ann, born Oct 9, 1833, married Edward Stringfield (b Oct 18,1 835).   Edward was in the Confederate Army for two years and was released to run the Sanders Mill on Richland Creek in Washington County, Arkansas.

Martha Ann’s fourth child, Phydella Almedia, born Oct 20, 1861, married Huston Scott (b Jan 25, 1853) in Decatur County, Iowa.  They lived in Benton County for a few years, were in Madison County in 1883, then owned a store in Goshen, Arkansas in 1885.  Phydella had eight children, two dying in infancy.  Huston died on February 14, 1891 of typhoid fever, leaving Phydella with five children and another one on the way.  She raised them at Mayfield, Arkansas.  Her humble home was a warm and loving place for all her grandchildren to visit.

Phydella’s seventh child, Fannie Rachel (b Nov 22, 1889) married Benjamin H. Mayes (b Sep 3, 1890).  They lived their lives in the Mountain Home Community, northwest of Goshen.  They raised two children: Kendal and Mayme.  Kendal lived most of his life on the Mayes homeplace.  Mayme married Joseph Clint Ferguson and they live near Goshen.

Reference Note:   HISTORY OF PARKER COUNTY, TEXAS