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Tag Archives: art

What a combination!

Medical Care


Art

Hospital History

Guadalupe Regional Medical Center offers it all!

The expansion and renovation of Guadalupe Regional Hospital is absolutely First Class.  The addition of the Art Wall and the walls displaying the hospital’s history are interesting additions.

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Visions in Wood – Marika and her students

If you have not yet visited Seguin’s Heritage Museum – hie yourself there – do not hesitate.

The wood sculptures by Artist Marika Bordes and her students are beautiful.  They live.  They breathe.  They speak.

The exhibit is on both floors of the museum.

 

Gwaihir — a 14-foot masterpiece

 

one of my very favorite pieces . . .

art on the wall – at GRMC

New feature unites hospital and community (article by Felicia Frazar in the Seguin Gazette Enterprise)

The Community Art Wall, located in the west hallway from the Central Entrance, is free and open to the public from 8:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. daily

Lucretia

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Ludovico Mazzanti was an Italian painter. He served his apprenticeship under Giovanni Battista Gaulli from 1700 onwards and was influenced by the classicism of Maratti as well as by the Baroque tendencies of Lanfranco in the refined form found in the work of Giovanni Battista Beinaschi (1638-88). His painting was produced in the cultural climate of the Society of Arcadia and the Accademia di S Luca, which included Odazzi and other Roman decorative artists. He took part in the Concorsi Clementini in 1703-5 and 1708, becoming a member of the Accademia di S Luca in 1744 and of the Accademia Clementina in 1748.

LVII. One day when the young men were drinking at the house of Sextus Tarquinius, after a supper where they had dined with the son of Egerius, Tarquinius Conlatinus, they fell to talking about their wives, and each man fell to praising his wife to excess. Finally Tarquinius Conlatinus declared that there was no need to argue; they might all be sure that no one was more worthy than his Lucretia. “Young and vigorous as we are, why don’t we go get out horses and go and see for ourselves what our wives are doing? And we will base our judgement on whatever we see them doing when their husbands arrive unannounced.” Encouraged by the wine, “Yes, let’s go!” they all cried, and they went on horseback to the city. Darkness was beginning to fall when they arrived and they went to the house of Conlatinus. There, they found Lucretia behaving quite differently from the daughters-in-law of the King, whom they had found with their friends before a grand feast, preparing to have a night of fun. Lucretia, even though it was night, was still working on her spinning, with her servants, in the middle of her house. They were all impressed by Lucretia’s chaste honor. When her husband and the Tarquins arrived, she received them, and her husband, the winner, was obliged to invite the king’s sons in. It was then that Sextus Tarquinius was seized by the desire to violate Lucretia’s chastity, seduced both by her beauty and by her exemplary virtue. Finally, after a night of youthful games, they returned to the camp.

LVIII. Several days passed. Sextus Tarquinius returned to the house of Conlatinus, with one of his companions. He was well received and given the hospitality of the house, and maddened with love, he waited until he was sure everyone else was asleep. Then he took up his sword and went to Lucretia’s bedroom, and placing his sword against her left breast, he said, “Quiet, Lucretia; I am Sextus Tarquinius, and I have a sword in my hand. If you speak, you will die.” Awakening from sleep, the poor woman realized that she was without help and very close to death. Sextus Tarquinius declared his love for her, begging and threatening her alternately, and attacked her soul in every way. Finally, before her steadfastness, which was not affected by the fear of death even after his intimidation, he added another menace. “When I have killed you, I will put next to you the body of a nude servant, and everyone will say that you were killed during a dishonorable act of adultery.” With this menace, Sextus Tarquinius triumphed over her virtue, and when he had raped her he left, having taken away her honor. Lucretia, overcome with sorrow and shame, sent messengers both to her husband at Ardea and her father at Rome, asking them each to come “at once, with a good friend, because a very terrible thing had happened.” Spurius Lucretius, her father, came with Publius Valerius, the son of Volesus, and Conlatinus came with Lucius Junius Brutus; they had just returned to Rome when they met Lucretia’s messenger. They found Lucretia in her chamber, overpowered by grief. When she saw them she began to cry. “How are you?” her husband asked. “Very bad,” she replied, “how can anothing go well for a woman who has lost her honor? There are the marks of another man in your bed, Conlatinus. My body is greatly soiled, though my heart is still pure, as my death will prove. But give me your right hand in faith that you will not allow the guilty to escape. It was Sextus Tarquinius who returned our hospitality with enmity last night. With his sword in his hand, he came to take his pleasure for my unhappiness, but it will also be his sorrow if you are real men.” They promised her that they would pursue him, and they tried to appease her sorrow, saying that it was the soul that did wrong, and not the body, and because she had had no bad intention, she did no wrong. “It is your responsibility to see that he gets what he deserves,” she said, “I will absolve myself of blame, and I will not free myself from punishment. No woman shall use Lucretia as her example in dishonor.” Then she took up a knife which she had hidden beneath her robe, and plunged it into her heart, collapsing from her wound; she died there amid the cries of her husband and father.

LIX. Brutus, leaving them in their grief, took the knife from Lucretia’s wound, and holding it all covered with blood up in the aid, cried, “By this blood, which was so pure before the crime of the prince, I swear before you, O gods, to chase the King Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, with his criminal wife and all their offspring, by fire, iron, and all the methods I have at my disposal, and never to tolerate Kings in Rome evermore, whether of that family of any other.”

Source:

Translated from the original in Jean Bayet, ed., Tite-Live: Histoire Romaine, Tome I, livre I. Paris: Societé d’Édition “les belles-lettres,” 1954, pp. 92-95.

whimsey

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whimsey

WHIMSEY:  An odd or fanciful idea.

J. Ruth Gendler writes that . . .

Whimsey is not afraid to be outrageous but she is basically shy.  She has all kinds of books, and she arranges them on the shelves by the color of the cover or how the titles sound next to each.  She was especially pleased to put a book on African dyeing called Into Indigo next to a dark blue book on Jewish mysticism.  Her clothes are also kept by color in the closet.

When Whimsey was a little girl, she would stay in the museum with the marble walls talking to the statues after everyone else left.  She has trouble keeping her shoelaces tied but in every other way she is as practical as your next door neighbor.  Because she is not wild, people expect her to entertain them.   She is not encouraging anyone else to live like her.  Remembering how abruptly her brother was locked up for being a troublemaker, she fears people who treat her like a curiosity.  Freedom is her lover.

Snap of the Day

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