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Category Archives: Texas

snap of the day

welcome!

 

MCQUEENEY, TEXAS. McQueeney is on Farm Road 78 four miles west of Seguin in west central Guadalupe County. German settlers moved to the area around 1870. When the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway was built through the area in 1876, the stop was named Hilda. In 1900 C. F. Blumberg built a store a mile east of the rail stop. Hoping to persuade the railroad to move the stop from Hilda to his store, he called the site McQueeney, in honor of the superintendent of the Southern Pacific line. The post office which opened in 1900 was called McQueeney, but the railroad did not move the stop from Hilda to the store site. In 1914 McQueeney had two general stores and forty residents. Lake McQueeney, also called Lake Abbott, was built a mile northeast of the community in 1925 by means of a dam across the Guadalupe River. It became a popular area for recreation and for summer homes. McQueeney had 300 residents and nine businesses by the 1940s; a population of 640 was served by twenty-three businesses in 1988. In 1990 the population was 2,063. The population grew to 2,527 in 2000.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Willie Mae Weinert, An Authentic History of Guadalupe County (Seguin, Texas: Seguin Enterprise, 1951; rpt. 1976).

Source:  Handbook of Texas Online

Note:

Carl F. Blumberg was born in Germany at the Russian border which is probably Poland today. The year was 1798. He died in 1853 of Yellow Fever and is interred in the Schumannsville Cemetery at Schumannsville, Texas – north of Seguin and 3 miles south of New Braunfels. Carl F’s education and principle profession was that of a school teacher.

a little theatre

 

When you come into the theater, you have to be willing to say, “We’re all here to undergo a communion, to find out what the hell is going on in this world.”  If you’re not willing to say that, what you get is entertainment instead of art, and poor entertainment at that.

DAVID MAMET, Three Uses of the Knife

It’s all about the food (and the service) (and the ambiance)

Food is an important part of a balanced diet.  ~Fran Lebowitz

no words necessary!

We will truly miss Edmund

We will truly miss Edmund Kuempel.

He was a man of character who touched the lives of everyone he met.

God bless Birdie and family.

An exceptional man

My Same Old 1998 Flood Story:  before this devastating flood, I had at least a couple of books that were written  and illustrated by Tom Lea.  He was an extraordinary and very talented man.

The Two Thousand Yard Stare by Tom Lea

The phrase was popularized when, in 1945, Life Magazine  published the painting Marines Call It That 2,000 Yard Stare, by World War II artist and correspondent Tom Lea.  The painting was not referred to with that title in the magazine article. The painting was a portrait of a young Marine at the Battle of Peleliu  in 1944 and is now held by United States Army Center of Military History, Forst Lesley J. McNair, Washington D.C.   About the real-life Marine who was his subject, Lea said:

“He left the States 31 months ago. He was wounded in his first campaign. He has had tropical diseases. He half-sleeps at night and gouges Japs out of holes all day. Two-thirds of his company has been killed or wounded. He will return to attack this morning. How much can a human being endure?”

ON JANUARY 29, 2001 RENOWNED ARTIST AND AUTHOR TOM LEA DIED AT AGE 93 IN his hometown of El Paso, TX, as the result of complications from a fall he had suffered the previous week. He leaves behind the monumental legacy of a seven-decade career as an artist and writer in which he used the magic of pen and brush to convey his deep passion for the desert Southwest and its people.