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It’s showtime!

Akira Fujii captured this record of the moon's progress dead-center through Earth's shadow in July 2000 by aligning his camera on the same star for successive exposures.

About 2:35 a.m. (Eastern time), one can view the lunar eclipse (if the sky is not real cloudy).

After weeks of buildup, it’s finally time to go outside and see the full moon go dark — or, if it’s cloudy, watch the total lunar eclipse over the Internet.

North Americans should have the best seats in the house for the event, which reaches its climax at 2:41 a.m. ET Tuesday when Earth’s shadow covers every bit of the moon’s disk. For more than an hour, the moon should glow sunset-red, thanks to the light refracted by the edge of Earth’s atmosphere.

– Alan Boyle, Science Editor

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About hopeseguin

Who am I? I'm still discovering just who I am, I suppose. A. Powell Davis writes that "Life is just a chance to grow a soul."

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