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Gentleman Jim Reeves

When country singer Jim Reeves died in a plane crash in 1964 at the age of 40 he left behind a lot of broken hearts but his songs are as popular 26 years on.

One of country’s most timeless singers ran out of time just 20 days before he would have turned 41. Jim’s legacy goes beyond his 80 charted singles, including 51 Top 10s, such as the No. 1s “He’ll Have To Go,” “Four Walls,” “Distant Drums” and “I Guess I’m Crazy.” It goes beyond 33 charted albums, four of which reached No. 1. Inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1967, his bronze plaque reads, “The velvet voice of Gentleman Jim Reeves was an international influence. His rich voice brought millions of new fans to country music from every corner of the world.”

Gentleman Jim Reeves was perhaps the biggest male star to emerge from the Nashville sound. His mellow baritone voice and muted velvet orchestration combined to create a sound that echoed around his world and has lasted to this day. Detractors will call the sound country-pop (or plain pop), but none can argue against the large audience that loves this music. Reeves was capable of singing hard country (“Mexican Joe” went to number one in 1953), but he made his greatest impact as a country-pop crooner. From 1955 through 1969, Reeves was consistently in the country and pop charts — an amazing fact in light of his untimely death in an airplane accident in 1964. Not only was he a presence in the American charts, but he became country music’s foremost international ambassador and, if anything, was even more popular in Europe and Britain than in his native America. After his death, his fan base didn’t diminish at all, and several of his posthumous hits actually outsold his earlier singles; no less than six number one singles arrived in the three years following his burial. In fact, during the ’70s and ’80s, he continued to have hits with both unreleased material and electronic duets like “Take Me in Your Arms and Hold Me” with Deborah Allen and “Have You Ever Been Lonely?” with his smooth-singing female counterpart of the plush Nashville sound, Patsy Cline,  who also perished in an airplane crash, in 1963. But Reeves’ legacy remains with lush country-pop singles like “Four Walls” (1957) and “He’ll Have to Go” (1959), which defined both his style and an entire era of country music.

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About hopeseguin

Who am I? I'm still discovering just who I am, I suppose. A. Powell Davis writes that "Life is just a chance to grow a soul."

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